Thursday, March 26, 2015

Spice Grubbed Candles

I love that primitive, rustic, old look that spices give to candles. It's a warm, cozy feeling I get when I visit a home that is filled with antiques and prims. You can easily make from already made pillars, votives and tapers candle that have that old world feel to them in no time!

This is a project where you want to leave neatness at the door. It's not welcomed here! You want to have each candle look like it is unique. They won't be perfect, they will indeed have flaws but that is exactly what makes them both unique and beautiful. 
 

 
 

Here is what you will need to create these one of
a kind creations! 


Straight Paraffin Wax (I used IGI 1239)
Fragrance (These were done in Cinnamon Bun)

Brown Candle Dye (I used liquid)
A Dipping Pot (keep it warm in a pan of boiled water!)
Spices (this is a mix of cinnamon, clove and nutmeg)

Pliers (to dip with)
Candles for dipping. I used Emergency Candles from the dollar store and votives I had on hand here.
  
Scent and color your melted wax according to your desired shade. Take one of the candles and dip it into the wax, holding it for a few seconds so it slightly softens. This will allow for the spices to better adhere to the wax when you roll them in it.  

Roll the warm, waxed candles immediately in the spices. They will not stick all over, but instead
randomly. You can do one dip and roll or as many as you want. If you plan to burn the candles, I recommend only a single dip as I've shown but if they will be solely for decoration, do as much as you want!

Once the candles are spiced, dip them again to put on a protective layer. These beautiful candles not only look and smell fantastic. Place them in a bowl with fillers or potpourri for a very rustic, primitive look.
Happy Grubbing!
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Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Leather!

One of my favorite scents from BCS is the Leather (This true leather fragrance has top notes of weathered leather and vetiver grass, heart notes of Oakmoss and brushed suede, and base notes of smoky Cade oil and thick musk.). This candle would be a great look to sell if you have a vendor booth at a Rodeo, but really anywhere they love Horses, Western Wear & of course The Rodeo!

Begin by making your pillar candle. I used the IGI 4625 Pillar Blend and the 30 Ply Flat Braid Cotton Wick & Leather Fragrance Oil with the Coffee Caramel Liquid dye.

Instructions for Use:

Heat wax to 190-200*. Once wax reaches desired temp, add your dye, blend well then add fragrance and again blend well. This wax should be poured between 185-195* into heated molds to minimize skip lines. It is advisable to poke relief holes around the wick of the candle once the wax has become solid but is still pliable.


After the first pour has cooled some, reheat your reserved wax from your first pour and refill the void (sink hole) in the candle until you reach the level of the first pour. You will want your second pour to be 10* hotter than your first pour to minimize lines from the second pour. Repeat the re-pour process as necessary.


Once the candle is cooled and out of the mold, you will need metal thumb tacks (push pins) I got a pack of 300 at the Dollar Store for..$1.00 and some hemp or sissal twine. 

Begin by literally pushing the tacks into the wax. This can be done at the top, the bottom or in a pattern. Your choice! Completely circle the candle with the tacks and you are pretty well done. Tie it in the center with a bit of twine for a more rustic look and you're done! 

This is a simple project that will set you apart from the crowd!

Happy Candle Making!
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Thursday, February 26, 2015

Palm Wax Pillar

Palm Wax is absolutely one of the most beautiful waxes out there. With absolutely no effort at all, you can create beautiful candles that all have a one of a kind appearance. Palm wax is a natural wax product and the pillars it creates are truly fascinating. This wax can actually be used in votives and container candles as well for a bit of diversity! 

Palm waxes are fun to work with and there are a variety of patterns taht can be created using it. This particular candle is made using our Granite Palm Wax.




Supplies List:



Granite Palm Wax
Square Braid Cotton Wicks (and tabs if using wick pins for a 3" round I use a 1/0. RRD wicks can also be used in this wax)
Seamless Aluminum Mold
Auto Wick Pin (optional)
Mold Sealer Putty
Mold Plug
Liquid Candle Dye
Fragrance


Assemble the mold by placing a round ball of mold sealer around the wick pin and pushing it through the bottom of the mold. Squish the sealer between the mold and pin to form a tight seal so that the wax will not leak through. 

Wax Instructions:
Heat wax to 205-210* add dye, blend well and then add fragrance and

blend well. Feather palm wax will hold up to 6% fragrance by weight. Pour the wax between 200-205* for best results.
This wax will require re-pours. Wait until the surface of the candle has crusted over, poke multiple relief holes through the surface of the candle around the wick and about 3/4 of the way down the candle, the candle center will still be fluid at this point.



Fill with reserved wax heated 10* hotter than the first pour. Repeat this process as needed. Palm waxes should be cooled a slowly as possible to inhibit the crystal structure to form fully. This can be done in a Styrofoam cooler or other insulated box. It is advised to use mold release when making palm candles in any mold.





Happy Candle making! Enjoy your new Palm Wax Pillars!

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Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Custom Pillars!

I love doing something that the next person isn't. Custom pillars seems to be that thing! I have loved making these for ages and they are quite simple. All you need is a little imagination! Keep in mind I did this to show that indeed these were images I simply painted into the mold. 

I've done round candles, votive size that looked like peppermint candies in the past. I've also done them in multiple colors to look like a rainbow and more of a tie-dye effect. There is no right or wrong here. Just go with it!

I would recommend only one thing and that is to be sure to over-dip the candles when you are finished in a clear paraffin wax to seal them. The dye will rub off and make a mess if you do not.


Supplies list: 
Big Bowl or bucket With Ice or Snow (I am in Minnesota!) and ice cold water.  
Pillar Paraffin Wax, I used IGI 4625 for this  
Wick Based on the diameter of the mold. Square or flat braid cotton are best.  
A vessel that can be used to overdip the candle. It must be at least a few inches taller than the finished candle for this. I used a pour pot as my candles are all less than 5" in height. 
Candle Mold (I prefer seamless aluminum) Keep in mind this may stain your molds so be sure that is ok with you! 
Candle Wick Pin and Mold Sealer Putty  
Fragrance
Liquid Candle Dye (and a cheap paintbrush!)

First melt your wax and add fragrance according to these instructions: 
Heat wax to 190-200*. Once wax reaches desired temp, add your dye, blend well then add fragrance and again blend well. This wax should be poured between 185-195* into heated molds to minimize skip lines. It is advisable to poke relief holes around the wick of the candle once the wax has become solid but is still pliable.

After the first pour has cooled some, reheat your reserved wax from your first pour and refill the void (sink hole) in the candle until you reach the level of the first pour. You will want your second pour to be 10* hotter than your first pour to minimize lines from the second pour. Repeat the re-pour process as necessary.


While your wax is melting, use a cheap paint brush to lightly paint the inside of the mold using the liquid dyes. Go light, they will run if they are too heavy! I like using a round mold and painting it to look like a peppermint candy! Or a square mold with stripes! More than one color is fun too. Use your imagination!

 





When the mold is painted, insert the wick pin. Roll a ball of mold sealer putty up (I prefer white) and place it over the pin, and bring it to the bottom. Now place the mold over that and move it down and apply pressure to flatten the ball of sealer out to seal the wick hole and make a stable base.






Now place the mold inside the bucket etc that you have for ice water. fill it up but be careful it will not be deeper than the fully submerged mold. Only as deep as. 

Now it's time to pour the wax. Follow the pouring and repouring instructions above and have fun! When the candle is complete, remove it from the mold, blot off (don't rub!) any excess dye and before inserting the wick, place the candle back on the wick pin (so the bottom is facing down) and use that as a handle to overdip in your paraffin. You will want this wax to be about the same temp as you poured, about 180*. Just quick dip in and dip in a bucket of room temp water right away. Have fun with these candles, they can be quite fun to make!


Happy Candle Making!
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Tuesday, January 27, 2015

The Amazing Emerald Sea!

Ahhhhh, sunshine & happiness. To me, that is everything a warm winter vacation is about. The problem is, coming home (I live in north east Minnesota) can sometimes be quite a shocker. 

We've spent the past three winters vacationing in Riviera Maya, Mexico. This place is truly heaven on earth. Perfect powdery sand beaches, the cool blue green Caribbean waters, the smell of the salt in the air and the breeze off the ocean. There are jungles, cenotes, ancient ruins, sea turtles, coral reefs and so much more! It's just paradise!

I keep wishing I was still there and decided a perfect reminder would be a layered Emerald Sea Pillar! Emerald Sea: This fruity floral blend is brightened by lemon and lime. Layers of mango and peach balance with peony, violet and sampaguita flower for an exotic sensation. A dry down of sweet musk and grated coconut completes the blend. Just think, salty sea air combined with the fruits and flowers of the tropics. It's amazing! Here is what you will need to make this one of a kind masterpiece for yourself!

Supplies List:

IGI 1274 Mottle Pillar Blend
Liquid Candle Dye in Ivory, Kelly Green and Blue/Sky
3" x 4.5" Seamless Aluminum Candle Mold
Pillar Wick Pin
Mold Sealer Putty
2/0 Square Braid Cotton wick, pre-tabbed
Emerald Sea Fragrance Oil


Start by preparing your Mold.
Tear off about 3/4" of Mold Sealer.
Roll it into a ball and spread it across the bottom of the mold completely
covering the hole.
Then insert the Pillar Wick Pin, inside the mold. 


After your mold is ready, weigh out 15 oz of wax and follow these instructions for melting, fragrance, dye etc:
Heat wax to 190-200*. Once wax reaches desired temp, add your
dye, blend well then add fragrance and again blend well. For 15 weight ounces of wax I would recommend about .8 weight oz. of fragrance. Since we are pouring in layers, and we want a funky, rustic look, wait until the wax cools to about 165 to pour your layers. You will want to "slosh" a bit of wax up onto the side of the mold with each pour. I used 1 oz of the fragranced wax for the sand color (remember the top of the candle is the bottom of the mold so pour in reverse order!) using a toothpick tip amount of the Ivory liquid dye.
After the first pour has cooled some, reheat your reserved wax from your first pour and refill the void Repeat the repour process as necessary. To make a rustic finished candle, do not heat the molds and pour the wax at 165*.

This process makes beautiful candles that remind you of a warm summer day or a vacation to somewhere tropical and magical! Give one a try, layered pillars are simple and fun to make!

Happy Candlemaking!

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